Environmental Review Toolkit
Accelerating Project Delivery

Eco-Logical Webinar

Table of Contents

Livability

Blueprint Jordan River: an Eco-Logical Approach

Central Texas Greenprint for Growth

Chicago DOT: Green Infrastructure for Great Cities


Livability      PDF [1.42 MB]

Slide 1: FHWA Livability Overview

Gabe Rousseau
FHWA Office of Human Environment

Image: Pedestrians stroll along a sidewalk on a sunny summer's day.

Slide 2: Overview

  • History & Defining Livability
  • Current FHWA Activities
  • Future

Image: Graphic of a checklist attached to a clipboard with the first item checked.

Slide 3: History

  • Livability has been a national initiative before...
    • Carter Administration's Livable Cities Program
    • Clinton-Gore Administration's Building Livable Communities Program
  • Now...
    • Obama Administration's Livability Initiative and the Interagency Partnership for Sustainable Communities

Slide 4: What is quality of life for an individual?

  • Health
  • Social/Community
  • Work
  • Money

Slide 5: Transportation affects livability for individuals and communities

Health Walking/bicycling, roadway safety
Social/Community Access to families, friends, services
Work Commuting — mode, time
Money Transportation Costs

Slide 6: What are Livable Communities?

A livable community is one in which people have multiple, convenient transportation and housing options as well as destinations easily accessible to people traveling in and out of cars.

“Livable Communities are where people have access to many different forms of transportation and affordable housing...”
U.S. DOT Secretary, Ray LaHood

See www.dot.gov/livability for more on DOT's perspective.

Image: Collage of four photographs showing various convenient transportation options: a trolley car on a city street, a family enjoying a bike ride along a bike lane, a city bus, and a pedestrian walking a dog on a bridge overlooking boaters on a calm river.

Slide 7: History

  • Livability builds off existing resources, policies, and programs:
    • Context Sensitive Solutions
    • Scenario Planning
    • Planning and Environment Linkages
    • AASHTO Bike and Pedestrian Guides
    • New funding programs from ISTEA and SAFETEA-LU (e.g., Safe Routes to School)
    • Increased options for project eligibility

Slide 8: Transportation Planning

  • State and MPO Planning
  • 23 CFR 450.200 and 450.300
    • ...to carry out a continuing, cooperative, and comprehensive multimodal transportation planning process...that encourages and promotes the safe and efficient development, management, and operation of surface transportation systems to serve the mobility needs of people and freight (including accessible pedestrian walkways and bicycle transportation facilities) and foster economic growth and development, while minimizing transportation-related fuel consumption and air pollution...

Slide 9: HUD-DOT-EPA Interagency Partnership for Sustainable Communities — Guiding Principles

  • Provide More Transportation Choices
    Image: Photograph of several groups of bicyclists enjoying a ride on a bike path with lush vegetation on both sides.
  • Coordinate Policies and Leverage Investment
    Image: Artist's rendering of a multi-use development.
  • Promote Equitable, Affordable Housing
    Image: Photograph of a newly-built, multi-unit affordable housing building.
  • Enhance Economic Competitiveness
    Image: Photograph of a business meeting with four employees discussing the graph that is displayed on a flip chart they are gathered around.
  • Support Existing Communities
    Image: Photograph of a city skyline on a bright, sunny day, showing the tops of numerous healthy, lush trees in the foreground and the varied architecture of a number of buildings, including red brick residences, larger office buildings, and skyscrapers.
  • Value Communities and Neighborhoods
    Image: Artist's rendering of a street in a newly-developed neighborhood, showing freshly planted trees and a well-defined crosswalk.

Slide 10: FHWA Activities — Livability Web Site

  • Existing funding sources to support livability
  • Division contacts
  • Case studies

Image: Screenshot of the USDOT Livability Initiative web site.

Slide 11: FHWA Activities — Livability Guidebook

  • Designed as a practitioners resource and guide
  • For MPOs, State DOTs and others in the advancement of livable community developments
  • Developed with FTA

Available very soon on www.fhwa.dot.gov/livability

Image: Cover of the Livability in Transportation Guidebook: Planning Approaches that Promote Livability, a publication from USDOT FHWA and FTA.

Slide 12: FHWA Activities — Livability Guidebook

  • Demonstrates the importance of linking land use and transportation planning
  • Ties together a wide range of overlapping objectives:
    • Walkable Communities
    • Transit Oriented Development
    • Complete Streets
    • Context Sensitive Solutions
    • Healthy Neighborhoods
    • Smart Growth
    • Sustainability

Slide 13: FHWA Activities — Strategies for Livable Communities

  • Developing resources to support practitioners:
    • Research Paper
      • Differentiate between livability and sustainability
      • Sustainability: Improving energy efficiency, reducing dependence on oil, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and benefitting the environment.
    • Livability Workshops
    • Toolbox of Training Materials
    • Model Regional Comprehensive Livability Plan

Slide 14: FHWA Activities — SEP-14

  • Opportunity
    • Conflicting contract requirements for HUD and FHWA funds.
  • Solution
    • Special Experimental Project No. 14 (SEP-14) to permit, on a case-by-case basis, the application of HUD requirements on Federal-aid highway projects.

Slide 15: FHWA Activities — TIGER II

  • Joint Planning Grants with HUD
    • $40 million in HUD grants; up to $35 million in DOT planning grants
  • TIGER II
    • $600 million available
    • Grant criteria include:
      • Livability: Fostering livable communities through place-based policies and investments that increase transportation choices and access to transportation services for people in communities across the United States.

Slide 16: The Future of Livability for FHWA

  • Funding program
    • FY 2011 Budget Request from DOT:
      • “$200 million in highway funding for a competitive livability grant program to assist...in integrating project and development planning processes within transportation, land use, and natural resource conservation in both urban and rural communities.”
  • Performance measures

Slide 17: FHWA Livability Contacts

FHWA Office of Human Environment

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Blueprint Jordan River: an Eco-Logical Approach      PDF [4 MB]

Slide 1: Blueprint Jordan River: an Eco-Logical Approach

Gabe Epperson and Kristine Widner, Envision Utah

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo
Image: Photograph of a winding section of the Jordan River in Salt Lake County, Utah on a sunny day. There is lush greenery on both sides of the river and in the background, purple mountains rise to the bright blue sky.

Slide 2: Salt Lake County: Jordan River Vision and Related Studies

Image: Drawing of a map of the area surrounding the Jordan River in Utah. The map has sections marked off with dotted lines, showing how closely the Jordan River Vision study and three other related studies overlap geographically. Those studies are the Salt Lake County Open Space Study, the Salt Lake County Water Quality Stewardship Plan (WaQSP), and the Trails Study.

Slide 3: Partnership with municipalities along the Corridor is critical for success

Communities include:
Lehi
Saratoga Springs
Bluffdale
Riverton
Draper
Sandy
South Jordan
West Jordan
Midvale
Murray
Taylorsville
West Valley
South Salt Lake
Salt Lake City
North Salt Lake City

Salt Lake County
Utah County
Davis County

Image: Topographical map of The Jordan River Corridor. The municipalities along the corridor are labeled and shaded in different colors for easy identification.

Slide 4: History of channelizing and development has altered the River

Image: A pair of aerial photographs of a section of the Jordan River, mounted side by side, with the following caption: “ The Jordan River Corridor in Murray in 1937 (left) and in 1990 (right)”

Slide 5: Jordan River Crossings

Over 50 river crossings (avg. 1/mile)

Images: A collage of three photographs of different crossings over the Jordan River: an early 20th century black and white photograph showing a wooden bridge with half a dozen young boys posed on its beams, a color photograph of a highway bridge labeled “Underpass & Hwy 201, and a color photograph of a “Bike/Pedestrian Bridge in Lehi”.

Slide 6: South Platte River Restoration: Denver, CO ($20 million federal grant)

  • 140 acres of new parkland
  • Elimination of 250 direct sources of river pollution
  • Restored wildlife corridor, native riparian vegetation
  • Spurred economic growth in neighboring areas (REI opened flagship store)
  • Today more than half of the state's bird species use the river as a habitat
  • Banks are lined with homes, mixed-use developments and businesses.

Image: Color photograph of the South Platte River in Denver on a sunny day. Along the right side of the river, a wide pedestrian walkway has been constructed, with large expanses of three-step sections that provide access to the river. There are also multi-level green spaces with mixed vegetation rising up from the walkway.

Slide 7: Providence River Daylighting: Providence, RI

  • Day-lighting involved the removal of 1,150 feet of roadway, asphalt, and concrete
  • New gondolas, docking platforms
  • Created an impressive focal point for the city and the region
  • Major economic development generator

Image: Color photograph of Waterfire Providence, the award-winning sculpture of one hundred bonfires installed on the three rivers of downtown Providence.

Slide 8: Chicago River: ($50 million invested in revitalization)

Image: Color photograph of page 34 of the Chicago River Agenda, within the “Enhancing Community Life” section. This page details the city's plans to convert the Main Branch Riverwalk into an accessible river-level walkway.

Slide 9: Provo River Restoration Project

  • Created a multiple-thread meandering river channel connected to existing remnants of historic secondary channels, wetland ponds and small side channels.

Long-term project outcomes include:

  • a five-fold increase in the trout population
  • doubling of the riparian bird population
  • diverse native vegetation
  • two additional miles of main river channel; and,
  • nine additional miles of small side-channel habitats and wetlands

Image: A pair of color photographs of a section of the Provo River, mounted side by side, with the following caption: “Aerial of 1999 pilot project before (left) and after (right)”. The “before” photograph shows a single-thread river with vegetation on both sides. The “after” photograph shows a multiple-thread meandering river cutting a wider swath with vegetation throughout.

Slide 10: Vision developed through public input:

3,000+ residents participated in workshops and on-line surveys

Image: A graphical representation of the results of a survey to determine Important Recreational Activities. Eight results are displayed as brown circles, each having a white cutout depicting a particular recreational activity. Each circle is labeled with the activity name and the survey percentage results. The circles are scaled to the magnitude of the result. From larger to smaller, the activities are: Trails (43%), Wildlife Viewing Areas (34%), Canoeing & Kayaking (9%), Parks (6%), Fishing (5%), Golf Courses (2%), and Sports Fields (1%).

Slide 11: The Vision:

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo
Image: Color photograph of a wide, lush green valley through which flows the Jordan River. A railroad bed straddles the far side of the river. Steep hills rise up from the valley in the background.

Slide 12: Establish Nature Preserves

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo
Image: Artist's rendering of a proposed nature reserve along the Jordan River. A color photograph of a section of the river and valley has been edited to include pedestrian walkways, educational billboards detailing local flora and fauna, and an open-air, roofed sitting area with a handful of benches. Numerous people are walking the paths or reading the billboards, a pair of geese flies above, and an egret stands by the river's edge.

Slide 13:

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo
Image: Color photograph of a different section of the Jordan River, as it winds through hilly terrain. A railroad bed flanks the far side of the river and a handful of generic-looking buildings sit on the river's near side edge.

Slide 14: Provide Recreational Amenities

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo
Image: Artist's rendering of the section of the Jordan River in the previous slide. The photograph has been edited to show many more trees and additional vegetation along the river valley, the hill on the far side of the river has been graded to accommodate a pedestrian/bike path, small rapids have been introduced to the river, and the buildings have been made more welcoming with the addition of colorful awnings, outdoor dining areas, plantings, terraces, and a boat launch. Pedestrians and bikers are utilizing the path, a colorful train is speeding along the tracks, and a pair of kayakers are negotiating the rapids.

Slide 15:

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo
Image: Color photograph of a third section of the Jordan River, in a more urban setting. A highway bridge crosses the river on the right. A pedestrian/bike path follows along above the river on the near side. Businesses flank the far side of the river. The only green vegetation is at the river's edges. Cars crossing the highway bridge is the only activity.

Slide 16: Facilitate Urban Renewal

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo
Image: Artist's rendering of the third section of the Jordan River in the previous slide. The photograph has been edited to show much vegetation added to both sides of the river, including numerous shade trees. The pedestrian/bike path has been widened and resurfaced; a second one has been added to the river's far side. A pedestrian walkway has been added to the highway bridge, and a boat launch has been added to facilitate access to the river. Benches and decorative streetlamps dot the paths. People are walking across the bridge and along the paths, biking along the paths, and fishing from a boat in the river.

Slide 17: Proposed Jordan River Commission

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo

Using the Utah Lake Commission as a working case study...

  • Implement the Blueprint “Vision” and “Principles”
    • Lake-to-lake trail, nature preserves, recreation amenities, attract tourism, nature centers & education and much more...
  • Raise funds for:
    • Purchasing critical lands, restoring wetlands, and capital projects: trails, boat landings, bridges, restrooms, etc.
  • Provide input on and review of appropriate design standards for large developments within ½ mile of the River
  • Create a forum for informed discussion and input about projects that may impact the River and the Region, such as:
    • water treatment facilities, regional trail systems and transportation projects.

Slide 18: Proposed Jordan River Commission

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo

Board Structure:

  • ⅔ of Board: (20 Reps)
    • elected representatives appointed by each local government
    • State Agencies (DNR, DEQ)
    • Water District (JVWCD)
  • remaining ⅓ = other organizations apply for membership and are selected by the governmental entities (if selected, required to contribute dues) (10 Reps)

Slide 19: Acquire open space, restore wetlands, capital improvements...

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo
Image: Artist's rendering from Slide 12

Slide 20: Provide Recreational Amenities

...bridges, boat launches, trail projects, recreational facilities, etc.

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo
Image: Artist's rendering from Slide 14

Slide 21: Facilitate Urban Renewal

...redevelopment, design standards, capital projects, bridges, boat launches, restoration, etc.

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo
Image: Artist's rendering from Slide 16

Slide 22: Joining the Commission WILL provide economic benefits to members...

Image: Blueprint Jordan River logo

  • A Commission increases the ability to attract Federal and private investment
    • Mitigation funds from UTA, UDOT and others, redevelopment, transportation grants, conservation grants from EPA, and more...
  • Increased property values
  • Increase in tourism and sales tax revenue
  • Linking trail to regional transportation systems will reduce traffic and improve health of residents
    • New North Temple, West Valley and Mid-Jordan TRAX stops on the River
    • New Frontrunner Stops near the River in S. Jordan, Draper, and Lehi
    • Trail connections to PRATT, Dimple Dell, Decker Lake, City Creek, Provo River, etc.
    • New DOT bridge crossings in Utah County

Slide 23: ...future of the Jordan River

Image: Artist's rendering from Slide 16
Image: Artist's rendering from Slide 12

Slide 24:

Image: Artist's rendering of an aerial view of the section of the Jordan River Corridor from Midvale north through to Murray and Taylorsville.

Slide 25:

Image: Artist's rendering of an aerial view of the section of the Jordan River Corridor at Riverton and Draper City.

Slide 26:

Image: Screenshot of a web page displaying a Google Satellite Map of the area where the Jordan River flows from Utah Lake, around Lehi and Saratoga Springs.

Slide 27:

Image: Screenshot of the home page of UDOT's Pioneer Crossing website.

Slide 28:

Image: Screenshot of the Interactive Project Map from UDOT's Pioneer Crossing website.

Slide 29:

Image: A second screenshot of the Pioneer Crossing Interactive Project Map. A popup window displays one feature of the project using an artist's rendering and some explanatory text: a new bridge over the Jordan River, connecting Pioneer Crossing to Redwood Road.

Slide 30:

Image: A third screenshot of the Pioneer Crossing Interactive Project Map, showing a different popup window that presents the new bridge feature from a different angle, with additional project details.

Slide 31:

Image: Screenshot of a .pdf file that is a map of the Mountain View Corridor. The map is color coded to illustrate Current Construction (red), Future Construction (blue), Future Transit Projects (green), and New Intersections/Future Interchanges (orange).

Slide 32:

Image: Second screenshot of the Mountain View Corridor .pdf file. This screenshot is an enlargement of the lower half of the previous slide's image.

Slide 33:

Image: Screenshot of the Mountain View Corridor Interactive Project Map from UDOT's website. The map shows current construction areas and future projects.

Slide 34:

Image: Screenshot of a web page displaying a Google Satellite Map of the area around the Jordan River in Lehi.

Slide 35:

Image: Second screenshot of a web page displaying a Google Satellite Map of the area around the Jordan River in Lehi. This image is an enlargement of an area around one of the bends in the river.

Slide 36:

Image: Screenshot of a web page from the UTA (Utah Transit Authority) website, displaying a section of a map of the West Valley City - Taylorsville Transit Corridor.

Slide 37:

Image: Artist's rendering of the West Valley City - Taylorsville Transit Corridor. A satellite map has been color-edited to highlight waterways (blue), highways (red), major arterial streets (black), transit lines (yellow), and proposed green space enhancements (green).

Slide 38:

Image: Screenshot of a web page displaying a Google Satellite Map of the area around a section of the Jordan River in Salt Lake City. The image shows the Jordan River Parkway Trail winding along the river.

Slide 39:

Image: Screenshot of a web page displaying a Google Satellite Map of the area around a section of the Jordan River in Salt Lake City. This image is an enlargement of a section of the previous slide's image.

Slide 40:

Image: Screenshot, from the UTA website, of a section of the Mid-Jordan Transit Corridor Project Information and Map. The image is an enlargement of a section of that map.

Slide 41:

Image: Artist's rendering of a section of the Jordan River and Jordan River Parkway Trail in Salt Lake City. A satellite map has been color-edited to highlight the river, canals, and irrigation lines (turquoise), wetland areas (light green), the parkway and trail (darker green), etc.

Slide 42:

Image: Screenshot of a web page displaying a Google Satellite Map of a closeup of an area around a section of the Jordan River in Salt Lake City. This image shows a bridge being constructed next to an existing railway bridge.

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Central Texas Greenprint for Growth      PDF [2.3 MB]

Slide 1: The Central Texas Greenprint for Growth

A Regional Action Plan for Conservation and Economic Opportunity

Presentation for Eco-Logical Webinar Series 10-26-10

Image: Logo of Envision Central Texas: Your Ideas / Our Region's Future
Image: Logo of CACOG: Capital Area Council of Governments
Image: Logo of The Trust for Public Land: Conserving Land For People
Image: Photograph of a wildflower field swathed in red, orange and purple blooms surround a healthy grove of trees on a bright, sunny summer day.

Slide 2: Central Texas is Booming

  • Central Texas has a population of 1.5 million people
  • Within 20-40 years, experts predict that nearly 3 million people will call our region home

How do you enhance economic development, preserve quality of life, and protect our unique natural resources before they are lost?

Image: Photograph of a city riverbank on a sunny day. The riverbank is lined with trees and behind that stands various buildings. Above is a bright blue sky dotted with puffy white clouds. A few rowing teams can be seen in the foreground.

Slide 3: Central Texas Greenprint for Growth

A tool for balancing sustainable conservation goals with the infrastructure needs of our rapidly urbanizing region

Image: Photograph of a patch of tall, bright yellow sunflowers growing in a rural farm field.

Slide 4: About Greenprint for Growth

  • Unique application of Geographic Information System (GIS) modeling and mapping technology integrated with local conservation goals to help communities make strategic, objective decisions about land conservation and development priorities.
  • Used successfully in more than 40 areas around the country to identify lands whose protection could meet multiple conservation priorities
  • Helps diverse community members reach common ground on conservation priorities as well as development and infrastructure goals.

Slide 5: Greenprint for Growth Process

1. Identify conservation goals for each county
2. Convert conservation goals into mappable criteria
3. Create maps that reflect each county's goals
4. Weight goals according to community priorities
5. Create overview maps that reflect each county's priorities & identify areas meeting multiple priorities

Slide 6: The Greenprinting Process — Step 1

Identify Conservation Goals for Each County

  • Protect Water Quality and Quantity
  • Enhance Park and Recreational Opportunities
  • Protect Sensitive Ecological Resources
  • Protect Cultural/Historic Resources
  • Protect Scenic Corridors
  • Conserve Farm and Ranch Land

Image: Photograph of a meeting of five people sitting around a large map on a conference table, while one person writes notes on a large easel pad.

Slide 7: The Greenprinting Process — Step 2

Convert Conservation Goals into Mappable Criteria

Sensitive Ecological Area Priorities

  • High Quality Woodlands
  • Migratory Bird Habitat
  • Wildlife Connectivity
  • Geologic Features
  • Sensitive Environmental Features
  • Native Prairies
  • Riparian Corridors
  • Springs
  • Threatened and Endangered Species

Image: Photograph of a man and a dog at the edge of wetlands on a sunny day.
Image: Photograph of a topographical map.
Image: Photograph of a water-pumping windmill and water tower.

Slide 8: The Greenprinting Process — Step 3

Create Maps that Reflect Each County's Goals

Image: 2 X 2 grid of four Greenprint maps of Travis County, Texas: Water Quality and Quantity Priorities, Rare and Sensitive Environmental Features Priorities, Recreational Opportunity Priorities, and Cultural Resource Priorities.

Slide 9: The Greenprinting Process — Step 4

Weight Goals According to Community Priorities

Vertical Bar Graph of Hays County Results:

  • 35% — Protect Water Quality...
  • 12% — Enhance Park and R...
  • 25% — Protect Sensitive Eco...
  • 4% — Protect Cultural and...
  • 9% — Protect Scenic Corri...
  • 15% — Conserve Farm and...

Slide 10: The Greenprinting Process —Step 5

Create Overview Maps that Reflect Each County's Priorities

Individually...

Image: Greenprint Topographical Map of Travis County, Texas illustrating Overall Conservation Priorities. Areas that have a moderate conservation priority are highlighted in orange and areas that have a high conservation priority are highlighted in red.

Slide 11: The Greenprinting Process —Step 5

Create Overview Maps that Reflect Each County's Priorities

...or Regionally

Image: Greenprint Topographical Map of Travis County, Texas and the surrounding counties. Image used as the background for the slide.

Slide 12: Central Texas Greenprint Resources

  • Regional Report
    • — Process and Outline
    • — Greenprint Opportunity Maps
    • — Current Conditions and Planning Summary
    • — Level of Service Analysis
    • — Implementation Strategies & Funding Opportunities
  • Hays, Bastrop, and Caldwell County Brochures
  • Supporting Maps and Data Available
  • Information Clearinghouse at www.capcog.org

Image: Photograph of two County Brochures.

Slide 13: How Can We Use the Greenprint?

  • Identify infrastructure corridors which support growth and maintain our natural resources
  • Avoid and/or mitigate conflict between growth and conservation
  • Analyze the priorities of one parcel of land, one community, or the entire region
  • Encourage sustainable growth that preserves our region's unique identity

Image: Screenshot of a website displaying a Central Texas Greenprint for Growth topographical map.

Slide 14: Conservation priorities cross county lines

Image: Greenprint Topographical Map illustrating that conservation priorities cross county lines. The map has a large white-edged oval drawn around a conservation area that straddles two Texas counties. A map color legend is provided in the lower left corner.

Slide 15: Case Study — SH 130 at Onion Creek

Image: Greenprint Topographical Map of Travis County, Texas and the surrounding counties. A blue-edged square in the center of the map highlights where State Highway 130 and Onion Creek intersect.

Slide 16: Case Study — SH 130 at Onion Creek

Image: Satellite Map of Texas' State Highway 130 at its intersection with Onion Creek.

Slide 17: Case Study — SH 130 at Onion Creek

Image: Greenprint Map of Texas' State Highway 130 at its intersection with Onion Creek superimposed on the satellite map of the same area.

Slide 18: Onion Creek Greenway — Concept Plan

One missed opportunity...one success

Image: Greenprint Map of Texas' State Highway 130 at its intersection with Onion Creek superimposed on the satellite map of the same area.
Image: Map of Onion Creek and SH 130 showing the greenway Corridor, COA City Limits, and Trails.

Slide 19: Mitigation lands can be more easily identified

Plum Creek Mitigation

Image: Greenprint Map of Plum Creek, Texas superimposed on the satellite map of the same area.

Slide 20: Greenprint — Ongoing Efforts

  • Continue to promote use of tool (report/maps) and online interactive mapping
  • Educate stakeholders (public and private sector)
  • Work with planners from jurisdictions and agencies to integrate into planning
  • Already influenced:
    • Bastrop County Transportation Plan
    • Caldwell County Transportation Plan
    • Travis County conservation rankings and greenway land acquisition prioritization

Image: Photograph of a muddy river on a sunny summer day. View is looking over a large tree root system, down a hill to the river in the distance. There are lush green woods on both sides of the river.

Slide 21: Selected Sustainable Communities Principles:

How Greenprint helps achieve —

  • Enhance integrated planning and investment. The partnership will seek to integrate housing, transportation, water infrastructure, and land use planning and investment. HUD, EPA, and DOT propose to make planning grants available to metropolitan areas and create mechanisms to ensure those plans are carried through to localities.
  • Provide a vision for sustainable growth. This effort will help communities set a vision for sustainable growth and apply federal transportation, water infrastructure, housing, and other investments in an integrated approach that reduces the nation's dependence on foreign oil, reduces greenhouse gas emissions, protects America's air and water, and improves quality of life.
  • Redevelop underutilized sites. The partnership will work to achieve critical environmental justice goals and other environmental goals by targeting development to locations that already have infrastructure and offer transportation choices.
  • Align HUD, DOT, and EPA programs. HUD, DOT, and EPA will work to assure that their programs maximize the benefits of their combined investments in our communities for livability, affordability, environmental excellence, and the promotion of green jobs of the future. HUD and DOT will work together to identify opportunities to better coordinate their programs and encourage location efficiency in housing and transportation choices. HUD, DOT, and EPA will also share information and review processes to facilitate better-informed decisions and coordinate investments.

Slide 22: Lessons Learned

  • Important to gain early understanding and “buy-in” to project
  • Frequent and accessible communications with stakeholders is very useful in building and keeping interest
  • Difficult to gather truly diverse stakeholder groups-need extra effort
  • Electronic polling devices are huge timesavers and consensus-builders
  • MOUs among different jurisdictions and agencies are extremely difficult to secure
  • Requires ongoing marketing and outreach
  • Need to set parameters of what can and cannot be done with tools, data

Slide 23: Questions?

For More Information...

Sally Campbell
ECT Executive Director
(512) 916-6037
scampbell@envisioncentraltexas.org
David Fowler
Senior Planner
(512) 916-6165
dfowler@capcog.org

Image: Envision Central Texas logo
Image: Capital Area Council of Governments logo

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Chicago DOT: Green Infrastructure for Great Cities      PDF [1.77 MB]

Slide 1: Chicago DOT: Green Infrastructure for Great Cities

FHWA Ecological Webinar
Richard M. Daley, Mayor

Janet L. Attarian, AIA, LEED AP, Project Director
Streetscape and Sustainable Design Program

Image: Satellite photograph of the greater Chicago, Illinois area along Lake Michigan.

Slide 2: Sustainable Streets

The Cermak/Blue Island Streetscape

Ecological Approach: A project-specific mitigation effort to demonstrate how sustainable infrastructure can support the urban ecosystem

Image: Satellite photograph of W. Cermak Road and S. Blue Island Ave in Chicago, IL.

Slide 3: Livability and Sustainable Communities

The urban form, with its density, public transit and walkable neighborhoods, is a sustainable way for humans to live. Its enhancement and maintenance for the safety and convenience of all users, is fundamental to creating a world where all humans can anticipate a good quality of life without depleting the world's natural resources.

Image: Photograph of Chicago late in the afternoon. Perspective is from high above the tallest buildings, looking south. The buildings cast long shadows on Lake Michigan.

Slide 4: Old Fashioned and New Fashioned Sustainability

Image: Underexposed photograph of a neighborhood street in Chicago. The image has been overlaid with an orange line drawing of a set of scales that are balancing one rectangle on each side. The rectangle on the left contains the words “Accommodate the needs of ALL users in a limited amount of space” while the rectangle on the right contains the words “Minimize impact on land, air and water resources”.

Slide 5: Cermak/Blue Island Sustainable Streetscape

Project Sustainable Goals
Stormwater Management Divert 80% of the typical average annual rainfall and at least ⅔ of rainwater falling within catchment area into stormwater best management practices.
Water Efficiency Eliminate use of potable water for irrigation, specify native or climate adapted, drought tolerant plants for all landscape material.
Transportation Improve bus stops with signage, shelters and lighting where possible, promote cycling with new bike lanes, improve pedestrian mobility with accessible sidewalks.
Energy Efficiency Reduce energy use by min. 40% below a typical streetscape baseline, use reflective surfaces on roads/sidewalks, use dark sky-friendly fixtures. Min. 40% of total materials will be extracted, harvested, recovered, and/or manufactured within 500 miles of the project site.
Recycling Recycle at least 90% of construction waste based on LEED NC criteria, Post/Pre-Consumer recycled content must be min. 10% of total materials value.
Urban Heat Island, Air Quality Reduce ambient summer temperatures on streets and sidewalks through use of high albedo pavements, roadway coatings, landscaping, and permeable pavements. Require ultra low sulfur diesel and anti-idling.
Education, Beauty & Community Provide public outreach materials/self-guided tour brochure to highlight innovative, sustainable design features of streetscape. Create places that celebrate community, provide gathering space, allow for interaction and observation of people and the natural world.
Commissioning Model Stormwater BMPs in Infoworks to analyze and refine design. Monitor stormwater BMPs to ensure predicted performance and determine maintenance practices.

Slide 6: Cermak/Blue Island Sustainable Streetscape

Image: Drawing of a cross-section of Streetscape Along Blue Island Avenue in Chicago. Areas are color-coded to illustrate the following concepts: Recycled content, Energy conservation, Storm-water management, Urban heat island mitigation, Public transportation, Water efficiency, Education, and Monitoring.

Slide 7:

Image: Photograph of storm-water management project along Blue Island Avenue, Chicago during construction. New concrete sidewalks have been installed with cutouts for sidewalk planters. Captions point to the following areas of note: Permeable Parking/Bike Lane, Sidewalk Planter, and Storm-water Storage Extends to Planted Area.

Slide 8: North Side of Cermak Road

Image: Drawing of a cross-section of Benito Juarez School Water Feature in Chicago. Areas are color-coded to illustrate the following concepts: Recycled content, Energy conservation, Storm-water management, Urban heat island mitigation, Public transportation, Water efficiency, Education, and Monitoring.

Slide 9: Benito Juarez High School Water Feature

Images: Architectural drawing of the Benito Juarez High School storm-water management project, looking down upon the grounds of the Juarez High School Addition. Dotted blue arrows show the planned storm water flow. Below that large drawing are six smaller photographs that show the area before installation of the project.

Slide 10: Benito Juarez High School Water Feature

Images: A set of four photographs that show the Benito Juarez High School storm-water management project in action during a rain shower.

Slide 11: Cermak Streetscape Infiltration Planter Detail

Image: Photograph of construction of infiltration planters in the sidewalk along Cermak Road, Chicago.
Image: Architectural drawing of an infiltration planter.
Image: Photograph of two stacks of concrete sediment boxes for the infiltration planter project.

Slide 12: Integrated Infrastructure Design Example: Parkway Bioswale

  • Stormwater Management
  • Pedestrian Buffer
  • Landscaped beautification
  • Urban Heat Island Reduction
  • Water quality
  • Reduction in potable water use

Image: Artist's rendering of a color-coded cross-section of a Parkway Bioswale.

Slide 13: Additional Project Elements

  • Concrete with 30% recycled aggregate, recycled wash water and slag — actual 50% recycled aggregate
  • N90 Warm mix asphalt with 15% RAP + 10% GTR with high albedo micro-thin concrete overlay — actual 10% FRAP, 20% Course FRAP, 5% RAS and GTR
  • Recycled glass in soil mix

Image: Photograph of a crew applying a recycled concrete mix to a roadway.

Slide 14: Beauty and Community

Human Scale

Allow for interaction and observation of both people and the natural world

Celebrate culture, history, spirit and place

Image: Architectural drawing, looking down at the planned storm-water drainage of a bioswale.
Image: Photograph of a new sidewalk with embedded drainage grates.
Image: Line drawing of a bioswale.
Image: Photograph of a solar installation.

Slide 15: Ecological Process and Grant Deliverables

Image: Two arrows emanating from the Eco-Logical logo, one points to a box that has “Sustainable Streetscape Education Materials” contained within it; the other points to a box that has “Sustainable Streetscape Design Manual” contained within it.

Slide 16: Education: Lightpole Banners Corresponding with Sustainability Goals

Image: Drawing of a map of a three block stretch of S. Blue Island Ave, showing the placement of two-sided Sustainability Goals lightpole banners.
Images: The six pairs of color-coded Sustainability Goals lightpole banners: Alternative Transportation, Urban Heat Island Effect, Light Pollution/Energy Efficiency, Water Efficiency, Storm Water Management, and Material Recycling.

Slide 17: Education: Informational kiosks/identifiers with interpretive graphics

Images: Photographs of two examples of informational kiosks/identifiers that are installed at the bases of solar installation towers.
Image: Photograph of the solar installation, showing the information kiosks/identifiers installed on the tower bases.

Slide 18: Education: Self-Guided Walking Tour Brochure

Images: A 2 X 2 grid of photographs of four pages from Chicago's Green Street Initiative's Self-Guided Walking Tour Brochure, including the cover page, a page explaining Hybrid Light Fixtures, a page listing Sustainable Streetscapes Do's and Don'ts, and a page explaining and showing examples of the implementation of two of the Sustainability Goals: Energy Conservation and Alternative Transportation.

Slide 19: Commissioning — Sustainable Design Manual

  • Design, Construction, and Commissioning Performance Report
  • Details the Implementation of Sustainable Goals, Including Ideas Not Selected.
  • Living Document to Include Construction and Commissioning Reports

Images: Photographs of three pages from the Sustainable Streetscape Strategies Manual: Design, Construction and Performance Report, including the report cover, a page with a vertical bar graph, and a page with two pie charts.

Slide 20: Commissioning — Stormwater Monitoring Plan

  • Scope
    • To assess the performance, effectiveness, and efficiency of individual and sequential BMPs relative to stormwater flow and pollutant load reduction.
  • This evaluation will include
    • Determining pollutant load and flow control of the BMP(s) under typical operating conditions relative to current background conditions
    • Determining the BMP(s) response to varying storm characteristics and antecedent weather conditions
    • Determining BMP integrity over the course of the study
    • Air quality testing for depolluting pavers

Image: Photograph of a section of a sidewalk, dug up, showing a drain and the connecting pipe that carries away storm-water runoff.
Image: Photograph of two men in cherry pickers, installing an air quality monitor at the top of a streetlight pole.

Slide 21: Commissioning —Construction Goals

As of August 2010 —10% Project Completion

Category Overall Project Goal Percent of Materials Installed as of Aug 2010
Regional Materials 40% 29.94%
Recycled Content 10% 2.00%
Construction Waste 90% 90.03%
Fuel Tracking: 825.55 gallons of ULSD fuel used to date

Slide 22: Lessons Learned from Eco-Logical/Sustainable Streetscape Implementation

  • Integrated design requires new roles within interdisciplinary design teams.
  • Technology availability may not always coincide with project schedules.
  • Changing “business as usual” within the public right of way requires contact with all public and provide users of the public way.
  • Monitoring information of local pilot projects is critical in order to accurately compare grey vs. green infrastructure alternatives.
  • Addressing livability issues within the public way involves inherently sustainable practices.

Slide 23:

Janet L. Attarian, AIA, LEED AP | Project Director | Jattarian@cityofchicago.org

Streetscape and Sustainable Design Program | 312-744-5900

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