Environmental Review Toolkit
Accelerating Project Delivery

Eco-Logical Reaffirmation Webinar
Landscape-Scale Infrastructure, Planning, Mitigation and Decision-making

June 28, 2016

PDF Version [27 MB]


Table of Contents

Eco-Logical Overview and Panel Discussion

Eco-Logical and the Forest Service - Celebrating 10 Years of Partnership


Eco-Logical Overview and Panel Discussion

Slide 1: Eco-Logical: Landscape-Scale Infrastructure, Planning, Mitigation and Decision-making

Reaffirmation Webinar
June 28, 2016

Presenters:
David Williams, FHWA Office of Project Development and Review
Sandra Jacobson, Forest Service

Image: Collage of colored photographs of a bridge, a deer, a fish, and a curved rural road from the cover of the Eco-Logical: An Ecosystem Approach to Developing Infrastructure Projects report

Slide 2: Overview

  • 10th Anniversary Eco-Logical Reaffirmation
  • Eco-Logical Approach
  • Benefits of Eco-Logical
  • Forest Service’s Application of Eco-Logical
  • Panel Discussion on Eco-Logical Past, Present, and Future

Slide 3: Reaffirmation Video

Image: Image from the reaffirmation video

Video: Also at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZlfY-kdWmg

Slide 4: What is Eco-Logical?

  • Eco-Logical Is: A landscape scale approach for planning and developing infrastructure.
  • The Eco-Logical Approach:
    • Draws on collaboration
    • Incorporates data
    • Establishes and prioritize ecological actions

Image: Graphic of the ecosystem approach: The words “Ecosystem Approach” are encircled by clockwise-pointing arrows and three components: Integrated Planning, Mitigation Options, and Performance Measurement.

Slide 5: Eco-Logical Background

  • Originated at Montana DOT and Montana FHWA Division Office in the late 90s
  • Eco-Logical published and signed by the Signatory Agencies in April 2006

Image: Reproduction of the signatory page from Eco-Logical: An Ecosystem Approach to Developing Infrastructure Projects

Image: Logos of the following U.S. agencies: Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Transportation (DOT), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Park Service (NPS), Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service (USFS), and Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

Slide 6: “Eco-Logical” by Other Names

General terms that describe Eco-Logical include: Watershed approach; Landscape-scale planning and mitigation; Ecosystem-scale planning

Agency programs similar to Eco-Logical:

  • BLM: Rapid Ecoregional Assessments
  • DOI: Landscape Conservation Cooperatives
  • EPA: Watershed Resources Registry
  • NOAA: Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Approach
  • NPS: Inventory and Monitoring Program
  • USACE: Watershed-Based Mitigation
  • USFS: Open Space Conservation Strategy

Slide 7: Why Eco-Logical?

Using the Eco-Logical approach leads to mutual benefits for all involved:

  • Improved data sharing and interagency coordination
  • Programmatic agreements on advance mitigation
  • Time savings through accelerated project delivery
  • Improved water quality and wildlife movement
  • Improved agency relationships
  • Reduces redundancy and increases the efficiency, transparency and predictability of the infrastructure delivery process.

Slide 8: Eco-Logical Timeline

Image: Graphic timeline titled “10 Years of Eco-Logical Landscape-scale Activities”

Slide 9: Landscape-scale Highlights from Signatory Agencies

  • BLM initiated 14 Rapid EcoregionalAssessments since 2010
  • DOI established 22 Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs)
  • EPA developed the Watershed Resources Registry (WRR)
  • FHWA gave over $3.2 million dollars SHRP2 funds for agencies to Implement Eco-Logical
  • NMFS conducted Integrated Ecosystem Assessments (IEAs) in five of the nation’s eight large marine ecosystems
  • NPS developed a report on the exposure to park infrastructure and assets based on 1 meter of sea level rise
  • USACE approved 738 mitigation banks and 52 in-lieu fee programs since 2008 and rolled out RIBITS
  • USFS removed or upgraded 2,100 road-stream crossings for Aquatic Organism Passage between 2008 and 2015.

Slide 10: Is Eco-Logical feasible for my agency?

YES!

  • Implementing Eco-Logical works within existing regulations and policies and represents forward-thinking transportation and responsible environmental practice.
  • Implementing Eco-Logical can be adopted using a phased approach and offers incremental benefits in terms of improved interagency collaboration and communication, and more predictable transportation and environmental review processes.

Slide 11: Panel Discussion

Panelists:

  • Nicholle Braspennickx, USACE
  • Brian Carlstrom, NPS
  • Rachel Herbert, EPA
  • Sandra Jacobson, Forest Service
  • Michelle Lennox, NOAA Fisheries
  • Catherine Liller, USFWS
  • Dixie Porter, Forest Service
  • Daniel Shivley, Forest Service
  • David Williams, FHWA

Image: Reproduction of the cover of Eco-Logical: An Ecosystem Approach to Developing Infrastructure Projects

Slide 12: Contacts

FHWA Office of Project Development and Environmental Review

https://www.environment.fhwa.dot.gov/ecological/ImplementingEcoLogicalApproach/default.asp

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Eco-Logical and the Forest Service - Celebrating 10 Years of Partnership

Some of the slides in this presentation are branded with the USDA logo, the U.S. Forest Service logo, and a large white pine tree silhouette on a blue background.

Some of the slides in this presentation are branded with the USDA logo and the U.S. Forest Service logo on a green background.

Slide 13:

Eco-Logical and the Forest Service
Celebrating 10 Years of Partnership
Accelerating Ecological Restoration to Create Resilient Landscapes and Communities Across the Nation in light of Climate Change

Sandra Jacobson
Pacific Southwest Research Station
U.S. Forest Service

Image: Photo of Gunnison National Forest showing a colorful forest with large mountains in the background

Slide 14: Forest Service Mission

The mission of the USDA Forest Service is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the Nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations.

Slide 15: What we do

  • 193 million acres of National Forests
  • 500 million acres help to S&P forests
  • 57,000 miles of trails
  • 4,300 campgrounds
  • $13 billion in NF visitor contributions to US Economy

Image: Photo of a placid lake surrounded by, and reflecting, colorful forested mountains

Slide 16: Where we do it: National Forest System Lands

Image: Map of the U.S. color-coded to show National Forests and National Grasslands

Slide 17: Where we do it: National Forest System and State and Private Lands

Image: Map of the U.S. color-coded to show Forest Ownership of the Coterminous United States: non-forest, private, and public

Slide 18: Ecological Restoration

Image: Photo of two Forest Service personnel preparing to plant young pine trees

Slide 19: Special Values: Water

Image: Photo of hikers enjoying a dip in a fresh pond just beyond a waterfall

Slide 20: Special Values : Habitat Conservation of endangered and at risk species.

Image: Photo of a lynx in a snowy forest

Image: Photo of an owl perched on a tree branch

Image: Photo of a pair of vivid red wildflowers

Image: Photo of a toad in the sand

Slide 21: Special Values: Sustainable Recreation

Image: Photo of a mother and young daughter skiing on a sunny day

Image: Photo of a father and two young sons holding up their catch after a day of fishing

Image: Photo of a hunter and hunting dog in a grassy field

Image: Photo of five people whitewater rafting

Slide 22: Eco-Logical: The US Forest Service’s Experience

  1. High Level Initiatives
  2. Project Level
  3. Tech Transfer

Image: Photo of the Pisgah National Forest showing low clouds nestled in forested valleys below a tall mountain range

Slide 23: Forest Service Initiatives Supporting Eco-Logical Concepts

  • OSCC
  • Watershed Condition Framework
  • Open Space Initiative
  • Aquatic Organism Passage
  • TRB, ICOET, ARC Solutions leadership

Image: Photo of a section of a two-lane highway that's been destroyed by a river

Slide 24: Climate change challenge

Office of Sustainable Climate Change: Guides the Agency in developing policies and practices to ensure the Nation’s forests and grasslands will meet the needs of present and future generations.

Image: Manipulated photo showing the earth in the palm of a man's hand with flames rising from the earth

Slide 25: Aquatic Organism Passage

  • FS does 160-350 AOP projects/yr—1000th in 2015!

Image: Photo of a circular wildlife crossing culvert

Image: Photo of a wildlife crossing culvert under a bridge

Slide 26: Project Level Eco-Logical Successes

  • Transportation Ecology Cadre
  • Highway 89 Stewardship Team
  • Project Collaboration Examples: I-90 Snoqualmie Pass

Image: Photo of a Forest Service project team

Slide 27: Forest Service Transportation Ecology Cadre

  • Provides expertise nationally
  • Eco-Highways Workshop
  • Expertise is rapidly retiring

Image: Photo of a man presenting at an Eco-Highway Workshop

Slide 28: Highway 89 Stewardship Team

  • Grassroots interagency team dedicated to reducing WVC
  • 89ST mentors 2 new teams through Eco-L funding

Image: Photo of a Forest Service team with shovels ceremoniously breaking ground at a roadside construction site

Slide 29: FS Interagency Project Collaboration

  • I-90 Snoqualmie Pass
  • Pinedale WY Trappers Point

Image: Photo of a Forest Service team meeting on a bridge on a rural road

Image: Photo of four deer traversing a dirt plain

Slide 30: FS Tech Transfer Successes

  • Innovative Approaches to Wildlife and Highway Interactions course
  • ICOET
  • Transportation-related ecological research

Image: Photo of a Forest Service team meeting in a large grassy field

Slide 31: Innovative Approaches to Wildlife and Highway Interactions

  • Began 2003 as 1-day course
  • 20 sessions later, 14 states, hundreds of students
  • Advanced and Intro courses

Numerous FHWA award winners are graduates!

Image: Photo of a Forest Service team

Slide 32: Forest Service ICOET Involvement

  • Conference funding support
  • Steering Committee
  • Presenters

Image: Photo of a Forest Service team meeting under a bridge

Slide 33: Transportation-related Research

  • Videos
  • Wildlife Crossings Toolkit
  • Forest Service R&D articles, studies, subject matter expertise

Image: Photo of a small herd of elephants crossing a road

Slide 34: Videos

  • 2014 Telly Award

Image: Reproduction of the cover of Avoiding Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions

Image: Photo of the cover of Innovative Approaches to Wildlife/Highway Interactions and its DVD

Slide 35: Wildlife Crossings Toolkit

Image: Screenshot from the Forest Service's Wildlife Crossings Tookit website

Slide 36: Transportation Ecology Research

  • Highly collaborative
  • Peer-reviewed journal articles
  • New studies initiated
  • International collaboration

Image: Reproduction of a journal article: The Jaguar Corridor Initiative

Slide 37: Eco-Logical: The US Forest Service’s Challenges

  1. Funding for transportation ecology
  2. Succession planning
  3. Diverse cooperating agency mission and information-sharing

Image: Photo of the Pisgah National Forest showing low clouds nestled in forested valleys below a tall mountain range

Slide 38: Take Home Message

  • The Forest Service is a fully supportive partner in the Eco-Logical concept and process
  • Large scale restoration and smaller scale interagency collaboration are key to FS Mission

Image: Photo of Gunnison National Forest showing a colorful forest with large mountains in the background

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