Environmental Review Toolkit
Water, Wetlands, and Wildlife

Great Lakes Stormwater Workshop

FHWA Stormwater Resources

Training:

Water Quality Management of Highway Runoff - A course offered by the National Highway Institute (Course #142047). This NHI course developed with EPA Office of Water provides an overview of the basic water quality parameters and processes, along with the requirements and guidance on best management practices the transportation community can use in mitigating highway runoff impacts and protecting water quality. This course shares approaches and technologies for the water quality management of highway runoff, including the effective maintenance, inspection and evaluation of Best Management Practices (BMPs).

Design and Implementation of Erosion and Sediment Control-NHI Course #142054 This NHI course was developed as a joint effort between FHWA and the EPA Office of Water, this course reflects the agencies' commitment to providing education and training on planning, design, implementation, enforcement, inspection and maintenance strategies to control erosion and sediment on highway construction projects, as well as to ensure that regulatory issues are addressed accurately and uniformly. Each discipline involved in a highway construction project has a different set of priorities. Reflecting NHI's commitment to learner centered training, the course offers participants opportunities for discussion and joint problem solving, through which they will gain information about the roles and responsibilities of other team members.

Alternative Practices for Highway Stormwater Management -This four-part Webcast series presented by the Izaak Walton League and sponsored by FHWA will outline the latest techniques available to help transportation agencies save money, comply with water quality and water supply regulations, and improve water quality with context-sensitive stormwater management practices, including low impact development techniques. These techniques also can help highway department personnel manage stormwater quantity and quality while using existing rights of way and providing easy access for maintenance crews. Each session will include valuable background information and specific guidance on how to apply these principles for highway projects. The series will also address barriers to using innovative stormwater management techniques and how to overcome those barriers. This series will provide valuable information to design engineers, planners, regulators, students, maintenance supervisors, construction engineers, and consultants.

  • Alternative Practices for Highway Stormwater Management: Design, Construction and Maintenance - Part One (September 21 1-2:30pm EDT): Design engineers, construction engineers, and maintenance supervisors will learn detailed information about how to design, construct and maintain stormwater management techniques that use existing rights of way immediately adjacent to the roadway. Two or three project case studies will be presented in depth by a panel of engineers experienced in implementing these techniques. Design criteria and specifications will be provided.
  • Alternative Practices for Highway Stormwater Management: Design, Construction and Maintenance - Part Two (October 26 1-2:30pm EDT): This continuation of the previous session will explore three additional techniques.

Previously Aired Webcasts:

  • Introduction to Alternative Practices to Manage Highway Runoff (May 18 1 - 2:30pm EDT): This session will explore alternative practices to manage highway runoff using low impact development (LID) principals. LID refers to a toolbox of techniques, some of which provide excellent stormwater management options at low life-cycle cost for highways. LID in a highway environment means managing stormwater safely and cost-effectively to reproduce predevelopment hydrology while using methods that are appropriate to and fit within existing streetscapes and landscapes. Learn more about the benefits of these techniques and transportation projects that have used them successfully.
  • Planning Highway Projects Using Alternative Practices for Stormwater Management(June 15 1-2:30pm EDT): Everyone involved in planning and scoping highway projects will learn about the benefits of watershed-scale planning in the highway environment. The session will include factors to consider in watershed-scale planning and how to save costs over the life-cycle of projects by planning projects in ways that allow design engineers to take advantage of existing stormwater management properties of the landscape.

Reports and Publications

Best Management Practices (BMPs) for Storm and Surface Water Management: Pollution Prevention/Good Housekeeping - Municipal Research and Services Center of Washington.

Caltrans BMP Retrofit Program Final Report

Caltrans Monitoring / Research and Applied Studies

Caltrans Stormwater Management Program - Information on current monitoring studies, publications, conferences, and links are presented. This site is oriented towards reducing the impact of California roads on aquatic resources.

Caltrans - Storm Water Data Report

Caltrans Storm Water Handbooks include information on construction site best management practices and stormwater pollution prevention.

Center for Disease Control - The CDC Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services suggests a more integrated systems-based approach to control mosquitoes when designing storm water management facilities.

Decentralized Stormwater Controls for Urban Retrofit and Combined Sewer Overflow Reduction - A study conducted by the Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) that focuses on how decentralized controls can reduce the volume of rainwater runoff generated and, consequently, entering the combined sewer system in urban areas.

Determining Components of Impervious Surfaces in Urban Watersheds - A study demonstrating scale-dependent methods for mapping impervious areas and determining the individual contributions of the various components of impervious surfaces to the overall storm water runoff issue.

Eco-Logical: An Ecosystem Approach to Developing Infrastructure Projects - Written by an interagency Steering Team, this 3-year study lays the conceptual groundwork for integrating plans across agency boundaries, and endorses ecosystem-based mitigation.

Evaluation and Management of Highway Runoff Water Quality (Water Quality Synthesis) - This manual will be useful to highway designers and environmental professionals by presenting the available and appropriate impact prediction and mitigation tools for use during highway project planning and development activities. This manual is a self-contained desk reference for highway practitioners with an extensive bibliography. To order a copy, contact the FHWA's Warehouse by fax (301)-3865394 or email: thomas.molock@ost.dot.gov The warehouse needs a printed request in order to send the publications out. You can call them and find out if the publications are in stock, (301)-322-5377, but you need to send a fax or email in order for them to send you the publication.

FHWA Water Quality and Stormwater Management page - Includes publications, reports, guidance and links for all of your water quality and stormwater management questions.

Guidance Manual for Monitoring Highway Runoff Water Quality - Provides guidance for selecting and using stormwater runoff monitoring equipment for monitoring of highway runoff. Published in 2001, the guidance provided is intended to improve monitoring information that will lead to better highway runoff management decision making. To order a copy, contact the FHWA's Warehouse by fax (301)-3865394 or email: thomas.molock@ost.dot.gov The warehouse needs a printed request in order to send the publications out. You can call them and find out if the publications are in stock, (301)-322-5377, but you need to send a fax or email in order for them to send you the publication.

International Stormwater Best Management Practice (BMP) Database - A searchable database of more than 200 studies evaluating the effectiveness of various stormwater best management practices for surface water protection.

Low Impact Development Center - The Low Impact Development Center is a non-profit water resource research group with a mission of conducting research and training, and sustainable stormwater management. Resources include publications, pictures, and other resources. Transportation Uses of LID, Urban Design Tools

National Highway Runoff Water-Quality Data and Methodology Synthesis - This resport evaluates the edxisting highway runoff quality data to determine if the quality and processes contributing to water quality constitutents in highway runoff can be adequately characterized on a nationwide basis to fulfill the information needs of highway practitioners. Results are also available through the internet at: http://ma.water.usgs.gov/fhwa. To order a copy, contact the FHWA's Warehouse by fax (301)-3865394 or e-mail: thomas.molock@ost.dot.gov The warehouse needs a printed request in order to send the publications out. You can call them and find out if the publications are in stock, (301)-322-5377, but you need to send a fax or email in order for them to send you the publication.

Maryland Storm Water Design Manual - Also available in print, for $25.00 per copy.

Metropolitan Council Environmental Planning - This manual includes detailed information on 40 BMPs that are aimed at managing stormwater pollution for small urban sites.

National Management Measures to Control Nonpoint Source Pollution from Urban Areas - This guide helps citizens and municipalities in urban areas protect bodies of water from polluted runoff that can result from everyday activities. These scientifically sound techniques are the best practices known today. The guidance will also help states to implement their nonpoint source control programs and municipalities to implement their Phase II Storm Water Permit Programs. Chapter 7 deals specifically with Bridges and Highways. Hard copies are now available at the National Service Center for Environmental Publications via phone at 1-800-490-9198 or via the Web site Request Publication # EPA 841-B-05-004.

National Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMP) Database - Project conducted by the American Society of Civil Engineers and the EPA to share information on stormwater BMPs.

National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) - Link to information about EPA's NPDES Storm Water Program (Phase I and Final Phase II):

NPDES National Stormwater Center

Oregon DOT Storm Water Management Program

Oregon, Stormwater Management - City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services

Retention, Detention, and Overland Flow for Pollutant Removal from Highway Stormwater Runoff - Provides guidelines for the design of management measures for the removal of pollutants from highway stormwater runoff, including vegetative controls, detention basins, and retention measures. To order a copy, contact the FHWA's Warehouse by fax (301)-3865394 or email: thomas.molock@ost.dot.gov The warehouse needs a printed request in order to send the publications out. You can call them and find out if the publications are in stock, (301)-322-5377, but you need to send a fax or email in order for them to send you the publication.

Street Edge Alternatives (SEA) Streets (Seattle, WA) - Includes a virtual tour of low impact development techniques used along Seattle's urban and suburban streets as well as design specifications for each technique.

Stormwater Best Management Practices in an Ultra-Urban Setting: Selection and Monitoring - A searchable database on runoff pollution reduction methods suited to limited space application. Included is a BMP selection criteria and decision support system and appropriate monitoring design and implementation recommendations. To order a copy, contact the FHWA's Warehouse by fax (301)-3865394 or email: thomas.molock@ost.dot.gov The warehouse needs a printed request in order to send the publications out. You can call them and find out if the publications are in stock, (301)-322-5377, but you need to send a fax or email in order for them to send you the publication.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Low Impact Development Page - This page includes a literature review and fact sheets that provide information on the pollutant removal effectiveness of the most common LID practices, including bioretention. It also includes an evaluation of permeable pavements for stormwater management.

U.S. EPA, Office of Water also provides downloadable fact sheets on best management practices for urban stormwater, including bioretention, porous pavement, wet detention ponds, and many more.

Virginia Transportation Research Council - A research brief entitled "Controlling Highway Runoff Pollution in Watersheds Supplying Drinking Water Reservoirs" details the study, research conclusions and recommendations for the use of a bioretention system for highway runoff management.

Washington State DOT's Highway Runoff Manual Resource Page- Includes LID techniques as well as conventional stormwater controls.

Washington State DOT Project Mitigation Cost Case Studies - Includes twenty-one case studies of mitigation projects by Washington State Department of Transportation. Examines the cost of mitigation for highway projects in comparison to project objectives.

Washington State DOT's Stormwater - Water Quality Program - Provides information on various aspects of Washington State DOT's stormwater management program.

Washington State DOT Stormwater Research Page - The research site of the Washington State DOT's Stormwater Program offers information on its research efforts to help identify state-of-the-art, cost-effective solutions for designing, constructing, and maintaining stormwater management systems.

Water Quality Action Plans - This guidance is recommended as a general outline of provisions that may be considered when developing a water quality action plan between FHWA and other cooperating agencies such as EPA, State environmental agencies and other resource agencies. Framework will integrate water quality issues and other environmental considerations into the planning, design, operation, and maintenance of transportation programs and projects on a watershed management scale.

Research

Cooperative Research Programs - The National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP), Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP), and Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) are applied, contract research programs that develop near-term, practical solutions to problems facing transportation agencies.

Washington State DOT - The research site of the Washington State DOT offers information on the research goals and projects of the department including the impacts of transportation facilities and methods on water resources.. Information specifically pertaining to Washington State DOT's Stormwater Program research efforts to help identify state-of-the-art, cost-effective solutions for designing, constructing, and maintaining stormwater management.

Water Quality Legislative and Regulatory Issues
FHWA 7/30/2006

Subject: Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users

On August 10, 2005, the President signed into law the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users(SAFETEA-LU). With guaranteed funding for highways, highway safety, and public transportation totaling $244.1 billion.

The Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) continued the pollution abatement and environmental restoration provided under TEA-21 and extended it to the NHS. The new law directs that the eligibility now is available to mitigate impacts caused by or contributed to, by any transportation project, not just those considered 4R. Furthermore, the new flexibility allows the use of funds for mitigation as stand-alone projects, as long as the measures are for impacts caused by or contributed to by a project funded under Title 23. The legislation retains the 20% limit on the total cost of the project when the eligibility is used on 4R-type projects (reconstruction, rehabilitation, resurfacing or restoration). The guidance on this provision will be released in August.

Subject: Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

Section 5027 of SAFETEA-LU established the Surface Transportation Cooperative Research Program. The goal of STEP is to improve understanding of the complex relationships between surface transportation, planning, and the environment. By September 15, 2006, FHWA invites stakeholders to review and provide input to the suggested lines of research that may be pursued within the STEP program. STEP is the sole source of funds to conduct all FHWA research on planning and environmental issues. You can help by visiting the STEP website and providing suggestions for research that may be conducted under one of the environmental emphasis areas described. Keep in mind that we are not looking for research proposals, just ideas about the type of research that you think is needed.

Subject: Wetland Mitigation Action Plan on Wetland Mitigation (WMAP)
In response to independent critiques of the effectiveness of wetlands compensatory mitigation for authorized losses of wetlands and other waters under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Environmental Protection Agency, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Interior, and Transportation released the National Wetlands Mitigation Action Plan on December 26, 2002. The Plan includes 17 tasks that the agencies will complete by the end of 2006 to improve the ecological performance and results of compensatory mitigation. 9 of the action items have been completed to date. In addition, the Army Corps of Engineers has drafted new wetland mitigation regulations, which are in final rulemaking. The remaining MAP guidance items will be completed to compliment the new mitigation regulations once they are finalized.

Subject: New Wetlands Regulations
EPA and US Army Corps of Engineers made an announcement, proposing a revision to the regulations concerning compensatory mitigation for authorized impacts on wetlands, streams and other waters of the US. The rule will establish standards for all forms of compensatory mitigation, which includes: restoration, creation, enhancement, or preservation. The goal is to made compensatory mitigation more effective at replacing lost aquatic ecosystems, increasing public participation, improving the practice of compensatory mitigation and new mitigation banks.

Subject: Wetlands
The Supreme Court issued a ruling June 19, 2006, establishing that the Federal government did not have the authority to protect some wetlands, but failed to reach a consensus on the scope of the limitation. The Court sent the case back to the lower courts to determine if ditches and man-made drains proved a significant corridor to connect wetlands with navigable waterways and warrant protection under the Clean Water Act. The case involved properties adjacent to ditches and drained to Lake St. Clair. The Corps determined that the wetlands were hydrologically connected to navigable water and therefore warranted protection. The Supreme Court ruling implies that the government may have misinterpreted the law, but leaves it up to the lower courts to issue a ruling.

Subject: Assessing and Managing the Ecological Impacts of Paved Roads
At the direction of Congress in TEA-21, a multidisciplinary committee was established to evaluate the ecological effects of road density. The National Academy of Science is publishing their report that focuses on the ecological effects of federally-funded paved highways in urban and rural locations. Recommendations are made for better tools and methods for assessment of impacts and planning for ecosystem mitigation. Copies of the final report can be ordered through the National Research Council.

Subject: FHWA Wetlands Domestic Scan Tour
FHWA has conducted a recent domestic scan tour of eight state transportation departments to observe and document innovations in wetlands banking and other mitigation strategies. This tour has resulted in a report documenting the practice and analyzing state DOT successes with using mitigation banking as observed by the scan team members during the tour. The scan team examined the mitigation banking review team process, the monitoring and measurement of mitigation results and effectiveness, and other related topics that have led to successful wetland banking programs. Problems and obstacles related to the mitigation process were also noted. The report titled, " Successful Wetland Mitigation Programs", will be available in August. Contact our office for a hard copy or download the version available at our web site.

Subject: Effluent Guidelines for Construction Industry
The U.S. District Court for the Central District of California has ruled on June 28, 2006, that Federal regulators' failure to establish stormwater pollution standards for construction and development sites violates the Clean Water Act.

The lawsuit was filed as a result of EPA deciding not to put out regulations or national effluent guidelines or performance standards for stormwater runoff from construction sites. The court rejected EPA's stand on saying the law allowed them to determine whether national guidelines are appropriate for construction sites and that the law allows other mechanisms to control runoff at the sites, in particular, the NPDES permit program.

Subject: SAFETEA-LU, Section 6006
Section 328 - FHWA is developing guidance that will be issued this month discussing the expanded eligibility of Federal-aid funds for environmental restoration and pollution abatement to minimize or mitigate the impacts of any transportation project funded under Title 23.
Section 329 - The FHWA issued guidance on implementing section 6006 of (SAFETEA-LU). This guidance discusses the new eligibility of Federal-aid funds for the control of noxious weeds and aquatic noxious weeds and establishment of native species provisions under this section. Information on the guidance can be found at:

Status of Current FHWA Water Quality Research

Project: International Stormwater BMP Database
Contractor: Wright Water Engineers, Inc, and GeoSyntec Consultants
Purpose of Work: WERF, ASCE-EWRI, USEPA, FHWA, and APWA have formed a coalition of organizations to fund and manage the International Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMP) Database. The work will consist of entering currently available and newly developed data sets, keeping the web site and database up to date, providing data analysis and developing protocols for integrating low impact development techniques into the database.
Status: The work is ongoing and the database is currently accessible through the website. We are also planning a teleconference in the fall to showcase information in the database and solicit more monitoring information.

Project: Evaluation and Update of FHWA Pollutant Loadings Model for Highway Stormwater Runoff
Contractor: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia
Purpose of Work: The Federal Highway Administration and the U.S. Geological Survey are cooperating on a national project to evaluate the existing highway stormwater runoff model and update the model using new information and software. This work will incorporate the existing model in a new software platform, provide information on the probability distributions of: precipitation characteristics, highway-runoff-volumes, highway-runoff concentrations, upstream flow, upstream receiving-water concentrations, and structural best management practice performance. This information is used to estimate the probability of concentration and loads in receiving waters downstream of the highway outfall and it will estimate the probability of the outfall exceeding water quality standards.
Status: The model is in preparation.

Project: Evaluation of Best Management Practices for Highway Runoff Control, NCHRP 25-20(01)
Contractor: Oregon State University
Purpose of Work: The objective of this project is to provide highway practitioners with the scientific and economic information needed for selection and design of best Management practices to control highway runoff. In April of 2003, the scope of this project was expanded to include issues related to Low Impact Development.
Status: The research began in fall of 2002 and work is continuing on the second phase of the project.

Project: State Transportation Agency Strategies to Address NPDES Phase II Requirements, NCHRP 25-25(16)
Contractor: Venner Consulting, GeoSyntec and Parsons Brinckerhoff
Purpose of Work: The research will focus on determining how state transportation agencies have addressed compliance with NPDES Phase II requirements. Research will be directed toward determining staffing and organizational structure throughout the entire agency to address NPDES Phase II compliance for construction activities as well as the stormwater management program as a regulated MS4.
Status: The project was started in June 2005 and is scheduled to be completed late September.

Project: Determining Components of Infrastructure to Stormwater Runoff
Contractor: U.S. Geological Survey
Purpose of Work: This research is to determine, using existing land use, land cover, and impervious surface data, the individual contribution of the various components to impervious surfaces, to the overall storm water runoff issue. Preliminary results of this report for 6 case studies (Washington, Virginia, Nebraska, Iowa, Florida) shows that the percentage of impervious cover contributions from road surfaces in these studies varied between 20 - 35%. Generally roads were at 28%, buildings at 29% and parking lots at 25% for total impervious areas in a watershed. As the watershed becomes more developed and the impervious surfaces increase, the contribution from the road surfaces decreases.
Status: Awaiting final report and should be available for publication soon.

Project: Guidelines for the Selection of Snow and Ice Control Materials to Mitigate Environmental Impacts, NCHRP Project 6-16
Contractor: Levelton Consultants, Ltd.
Purpose of Work: Every year considerable quantities of snow and ice control products are applied to highways, there is a balancing act of maintaining safety and applying what is needed without causing environmental impacts. This project is looking at a way to define the selection of winter maintenance materials based on their environmental impact. They will be looking at the most common chemical alternatives such as sodium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, calcium magnesium acetate, potassium acetate, etc. This project will develop guidelines for selection of snow and ice control chemicals and abrasives, based on their constituents, performance, environmental impacts, cost and site-specific conditions. They will look at the environmental impacts of the effects on human health, aquatic life, flora and fauna, surface-water and groundwater quality, air quality, vehicles, and physical infrastructure including bridges, pavements, railway electronic signaling systems and power distribution lines. In the past they have focused on performance and cost under various weather conditions without evaluating their relative impacts on the environment.
Status: Interim report has been received and approved by project panel. The final report is being worked on.

Project: Management of the Discharge and Quality of Highway Runoff in Karst Areas to Control Impacts to Ground Water
Contractor: P.E. La Moreaux and Associates
Purpose of Work: Try to assess the observed and potential contamination of ground water by highway stormwater runoff in karst areas. Identify the total, significant, and serious contamination problem karst areas in the United States and analyze and investigate the pertinent soils, chemistry, hydraulic, geotechnical and geological problem involved. Then develop feasible remedial measures to prevent or eliminate the ground water contamination from highway surface water in karst areas.
Status: The final report is finished and publication is pending.

Available reports and publications:

Eco-Logical (2006) - Eco-Logical is a guide or process for a comprehensive management approach that Federal, State and local partners can use to get involved in infrastructure, planning, design, review, and the construction of projects to work more efficiently and effectively together. The process integrates infrastructure development with ecosystem management to advance project approvals with conservation and sustainable land development practices.

Environmental Stewardship Practices, Policies, and Procedures for Road Construction and Maintenance (2005) - This report developed a compendium of environmental stewardship practices, policies, and procedures in areas of construction and maintenance.

Common Native Roadside Wildflowers (2005) This field guide highlights100 native forbs and grasses commonly found on highway rights-of-way in Western America. All are native to the United States and do not include introduces plants that have been naturalized.

The Nature of Roadsides and the Tools to Work with It - 2003

This publication discusses the various tools available for right of way managers. Highway corridors crisscross our nation and the management of these acres of land is complicated by many uses: recovery zone for errant vehicles, utility lines, snow storage, open space, wetland mitigation, wildlife corridors, greenways, signage and biodiversity. This publication discusses some of the methods and tools available to protect and manage the beauty and value of our roadside biota.

The National Highway Runoff Data and Methodology Synthesis -2003

Volume I: Technical Issues for Monitoring Highway Runoff and Urban Stormwater

Volume II : Project Documentation with CD based bibliographic database of reports

Volume III - Availability and Documentation of Published Information for Synthesis of Regional or National Highway Runoff Quality Data
This report evaluates the existing highway runoff quality data to determine if the quality and processes contributing to water quality constituents in highway runoff can be adequately characterized on a nationwide basis to fulfill the information needs of highway practitioners.

Common Roadside Wildflowers (2003) This field guide highlights 100 native forbs/grasses commonly found on highway rights-of-way and other natural areas across Eastern America. State Departments of Transportation are encouraging them for many reasons: their natural beauty, adaption to arid environments, usefulness to small critters, addition to biodiversity and land health, ability to slow water runoff, and slope stabilization.

Aquatic Ecology and Stream Restoration Video - Fall 2003 This video showcases six stream restoration case studies from across the nation and promotes the importance of restoring our streams after road construction. This project documents examples of a nationwide effort on stream restoration showing the appropriate designs and techniques for stream relocation, fish and wildlife habitat preservation and methods to improve the water quality while providing safe efficient roadways. The series of videos has been developed by North Carolina Department of Transportation for Federal Highway Administration and is now available.

Keeping it Simple - Easy Ways to Help Wildlife Along Roads (2003) This brochure highlights more than 100 simple, successful activities that help make roads more wildlife friendly, from all 50 States. These success stories are also available at our website: www.fjwa.dot.gov/environment/wildlifeprotection The website allows users to search by state and by category, and it provides contact information for sending new "keeping it simple" success stories to be added to the site.

Assessing the Impacts of Bridge Deck Runoff Contaminants in Receiving Waters- 2002, NCHRP Report 474, Volume 1: Final Report, Volume 2: Practitioner's Handbook
This report presents guidance for assessing and if necessary mitigating the impacts of bridge deck runoff. The final report includes findings of the literature review and a survey of highway agency practices, consultation and testing of sites. The second volume or practitioner's handbook presents the assessment process as a result of the final report.

Wet Detention Pond Design for Highway Runoff Pollution Control - The research developed a methodology for designing efficient wet detention ponds in the highway environment. The methodology included performance characteristics, design guidelines, conditions, limitations, and applications for use. A comparison was made between wet detention ponds and dry detention ponds in order to show the advantages and disadvantages of each system.

Status: The preliminary draft final report was submitted to the technical oversight panel for review. Research is complete. The unedited final report for NCHRP Project 25-12 as prepared by the University of Washington is available for loan by contacting NCHRP at NCHRP@nas.edu.

Common Roadside Invasives (2002) This laminated field guide identifies common and showy roadside invasive grasses and forbs, all of which are on various State noxious weed lists. We provide this guide with the expectation that it will help roadside vegetation managers and maintenance personnel to identify and control ivasieve plants in their jurisdictions.

Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Across European Highways - August 2002 The Federal Highway Administration, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program sponsored an international technology scan to learn what actions are being taken in Europe to address habitat and wildlife issues. As a result of the trip, the team formed conclusions and recommendations for U.S. Application in the areas of policy, communication, guidance manuals, and research. This publication is available from our Office of International Programs.

Management of Runoff from Surface Transportation Facilities--Synthesis and Research Plan, 2001, NCHRP Web Document 37 The final report has been posted as NCHRP Web Document 37
The objectives of this research, on the management of the quality and quantity of runoff waters from surface transportation facilities, was to (1) synthesize existing knowledge and practice into a form usable by practitioners; (2) develop a strategic research plan to address gaps in existing knowledge; and (3) recommend a system for continued exchange of information between practitioners and others interested in water-quality and runoff issues.

Guidance Manual for Monitoring Highway Runoff Water Quality - June 2001 The Federal Highway Administration contracted with URS Group, Inc. to conduct an evaluation of water quality monitoring equipment for measuring the constituents of highway stormwater runoff. Testing was done on the methodologies and use of these various monitoring and sampling equipment in the highway environment. The results are presented in this report. This manual will assist States and help local governments prepare highway stormwater monitoring programs based on monitoring goals. Guidance is provided to assist the user in not only selecting equipment, but also with highway stormwater runoff monitoring designs for a comprehensive plan. Recommendations and field evaluations are given for specific equipment and monitoring methods. The report provides recommendations on adaptations necessary for using available off-the-shelf equipment to improve the evaluation of stormwater runoff in the highway setting.

Wetlands Data Reporting System - Spring 2001 The FHWA has developed a tool, Wetlands Accounting Database, for collecting and analyzing wetland mitigation data. The database is designed to accumulate data about wetlands mitigation projects. It collects, correlates, and presents this data as useful and meaningful information. The CD-based software is available upon request.

Case Histories of Wetland Restoration - December 2000
This report highlights four wetland restoration projects from regionally different areas within the United States. These studies show that restoration can result in highly successful ecological communities that are similar in structure and function to the natural ones. The goals, objectives, and criteria for restoration should be established in relation to the water regime of the drainage basin and ecosystem in which they lie. The four projects in this publication offer some insight into what elements lead to a successful restoration project. There is no single path, but certain elements and themes emerge from the examination of these projects.

Environmental Impact of Construction and Repair Materials on Surface and Ground Waters - NCHRP 25-9 - June 2000 The CD-ROM based report presents a validated methodology for assessing the environmental impact of highway construction and repair materials on surface and ground water under six general highway reference environments. This methodology includes: (1) a set of comprehensive bioassay protocols that directly measure the toxicity of leachates from highway construction and repair materials on two target organisms, the water flea, Daphnia magna, and the freshwater algae, Selenastrum capricornutum, and (2) the IMPACT model that can estimate the fate and transport of such leachates in typical highway environments. The IMPACT model is based on an extensive database of bioassay toxicity results for materials ranging from common construction and repair products to waste and recycled materials proposed for use in highway construction.

Stormwater Management Practices in an Ultra-Urban Setting: Selection and Monitoring - May 2000 This report focuses on design criteria, and monitoring studies on stormwater best management practices (BMPs) implemented in and ultra-urban settings. The report provides and planning level review of the applicability and use of new and some of the more traditional BMPs in ultra-urban areas. The report provides specific guidance for selecting and siting stormwater management technologies. Case studies are used to highlight various examples throughout the country that address ultra-urban considerations.

Critter Crossings -Linking Habitats and Reducing Roadkill - February 2000
This brochure describes the transportation impacts on wildlife and highlights projects and processes that help to reduce these impacts.

Roadside Use of Native Plants - September 1999
This publication is for use in making site specific decisions. The primer gives a holistic background information for making decisions. It address basic techniques for using native plants. The State by State section pulls together native, endangered, and noxious plant lists to aid in design and management.. The manual includes: definitions, bibliographies, and policy citations to clarify the use of native plants on roadsides.

Evaluation and Management of Highway Runoff Water Quality - June 1996
This manual synthesizes the results of past documentation and research on highway stormwater runoff into a single-volume user=s manual on water quality impact assessment and mitigation. It presents available and appropriate impact prediction and mitigation tools for use during highway project planning and development activities.

Training and Courses:

Design and Implementation of Erosion and Sediment Control -NHI Course #142054
This NHI course was developed as a joint effort between FHWA and the EPA Office of Water, this course reflects the agencies' commitment to providing education and training on planning, design, implementation, enforcement, inspection and maintenance strategies to control erosion and sediment on highway construction projects, as well as to ensure that regulatory issues are addressed accurately and uniformly. Each discipline involved in a highway construction project has a different set of priorities. Reflecting NHI's commitment to learner centered training, the course offers participants opportunities for discussion and joint problem solving, through which they will gain information about the roles and responsibilities of other team members.

Water Quality Management of Highway Runoff -NHI Course #142047

This NHI course developed with EPA Office of Water provides an overview of the basic water quality parameters and processes, along with the requirements and guidance on best management practices the transportation community can use in mitigating highway runoff impacts and protecting water quality. This course shares approaches and technologies for the water quality management of highway runoff, including the effective maintenance, inspection and evaluation of Best Management Practices (BMPs).

Mitigating Road Impacts on Streams - NHI Course #142048
Contractor- McCormick & Taylor
Development of training modules is proceeding.

Great Lakes Initiative Stormwater Workshop - August 2006
The Great Lakes Regional Collaboration was initiated by Executive Order 13340, issued in May 2004. This order acknowledged the national significance of the Great Lakes and created a unique partnership of key members from federal, state, and local governments, tribes and others for the purpose of developing a strategic plan to restore and protect the Great Lakes ecosystem. The executive order set up a Federal Interagency Task Force and a Regional Working Group. On December 12, 2005 the Great Lakes Interagency Task Force met to reinforce and demonstrate commitment and collaborative effort to promote further work and progress in the Great Lakes area. The task force identified existing Federal programs that will support Great Lakes ecosystem restoration and developed a list of action items to implement in support of the collaborations. From this meeting in December, the Department of Transportation/Federal Highway Administration committed to convene a gathering of Great Lakes State DOTs to collaborate, share information, build contacts and look at issues and develop strategies for dealing with stormwater runoff in the Great Lakes region.

2007 Environmental Excellence Awards - These awards have been designed to recognize outstanding transportation projects, processes, and people who incorporate environmental stewardship into the planning and project development processes using FHWA funding sources. We are accepting applications on-line through August 15, 2006. The winners will be recognized at our International Conference on Ecology and Transportation in Little Rock, Arkansas on May 20-25, 2007.

Alternative Practices for Highway Stormwater Management - Fall 2006 This four-part Webcast series presented by the Izaak Walton League and sponsored by FHWA will outline the latest techniques available to help transportation agencies save money, comply with water quality and water supply regulations, and improve water quality with context-sensitive stormwater management practices, including low impact development techniques. These techniques also can help highway department personnel manage stormwater quantity and quality while using existing rights of way and providing easy access for maintenance crews. Each session will include valuable background information and specific guidance on how to apply these principles for highway projects. The series will also address barriers to using innovative stormwater management techniques and how to overcome those barriers. This series will provide valuable information to design engineers, planners, regulators, students, maintenance supervisors, construction engineers, and consultants. Future telecasts include: Alternative Practices for Highway Stormwater Management: Design, Construction and Maintenance - (October 26 1-2:30pm EDT), and Alternative Practices for Highway Stormwater Management: Design, Construction and Maintenance - (December 7 1-2:30pm EDT).

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Questions and feedback should be directed to Susan Jones (Susan.Jones@dot.gov, 202-493-2139) and Marcel Tchaou (Marcel.Tchaou@dot.gov, 202-366-4196).

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