Environmental Review Toolkit
Accelerating Project Delivery
Print Version

Search Results

Displaying Results 11 - 18 out of 18
[New Search] << Previous | Next >>
State="California"; Category=" all"; Expand All
11 Practice: Caltrans Big Slough Watershed Partnership
Categories: Mitigation
Public Involvement
State: California
Organization: California Department of Transportation
Contact: Gary Winters
Title: Chief, Division of Environmental Analysis
Email: gary.winters@dot.ca.gov
Phone: (916) 653-7136
Description: The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 5 has developed a partnership with the Elkhorn Slough Foundation (ESF) to cooperatively protect and improve the environment of the Elkh ...[click for more]
Last Updated: July 18, 2007
12 Practice: Caltrans Determination of State Wildlife Connectivity Needs
Categories: GIS and Spatial Data
Habitat/Ecosystem Connectivity & Conservation
Interagency Coordination
Land Use Planning & Smart Growth
State: California
Organization: California Department of Transportation
Contact: Gary Winters
Title: Chief, Division of Environmental Analysis
Email: gary.winters@dot.ca.gov
Phone: (916) 653-7136
Description: Habitat fragmentation is becoming a great concern for the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) along old as well as new alignments where traffic, median barriers, and widening are compou ...[click for more]
Last Updated: March 30, 2007
13 Practice: Interagency Funding
State: California
Organization: Federal Highway Administration CA Division
Contact: David Tedrick
Title: Environmental Program Manager
Email: David.Tedrick@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 916-498-5024
Description:

The California Department of Transportation is currently funding several positions through agreements with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other resource agencies.

Current fu ...[click for more]

Related Documentation: http://wwwcf.fhwa.dot.gov/exit.cfm?link=http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/tpp/offices/orip/PIP.pdf
Last Updated: September 8, 2006
14 Practice: SACOG Blueprint Project
Categories: Land Use Planning & Smart Growth
Linking Planning and NEPA
State: California
Organization: Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG)
Contact: Debra Jones
Title: Project Delivery Manager
Email: DJones@sacog.org
Phone: 916.340.6242
Description: The Sacramento Council of Governments (SACOG) Blueprint Project for smart growth started as a way to look at and optimize land uses in the Sacramento County by overlaying GIS data layers (e.g., greens ...[click for more]
Related Documentation: http://www.sacregionblueprint.org/sacregionblueprint/home.cfm
Last Updated: August 3, 2006
15 Practice: Memorandum of Agreement for Early Mitigation Planning for Transportation Improvements
Categories: Environmental Stewardship & Streamlining
Habitat/Ecosystem Connectivity & Conservation
Interagency Agreements: MOAs, MOUs, and Programmatic Agreements
Process/NEPA
Wildlife and Threatened & Endangered Species
State: California
Organization: Federal Highway Administration CA Division
Contact: David Tedrick
Title: Environmental Program Manager
Email: David.Tedrick@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 916-498-5024
Description: The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), the California Department of Fish and Game (DFG), the U.S.  ...[click for more]
Related Documentation: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/cadiv/pre/moajoan.htm
Last Updated: March 13, 2006
16 Practice: MOA for Early Mitigation Planning for Transportation Improvements in California
Categories: Habitat/Ecosystem Connectivity & Conservation
Interagency Coordination
Watersheds & Wetlands
State: California
Organization: Federal Highway Administration CA Division
Contact: David Tedrick
Title: Environmental Program Manager
Email: David.Tedrick@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 916-498-5024
Description: The California Department of Transportation, the Federal Highway Administration, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the California Department of Fish and Game, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the Envi ...[click for more]
Related Documentation: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/cadiv/pre/moajoan.htm
Last Updated: July 26, 2005
17 Practice: Caltrans Streambed Alteration Agreement with the California Department of Fish and Game
Categories: Habitat/Ecosystem Connectivity & Conservation
Indirect and Cumulative Impacts
Interagency Agreements: MOAs, MOUs, and Programmatic Agreements
Interagency Coordination
Mitigation
Watersheds & Wetlands
Wetland Banking
Wildlife and Threatened & Endangered Species
State: California
Organization: California Department of Transportation
Contact: Gary Winters
Title: Chief, Division of Environmental Analysis
Email: gary.winters@dot.ca.gov
Phone: (916) 653-7136
Description: The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) Programmatic Streambed Alteration Agreement allows repetitive work to be conducted in and adjacent to streams without the need to repeat the appl ...[click for more]
Last Updated: July 25, 2005
18 Practice: Caltrans Coal Canyon Interchange Removal for Enhancement of Wildlife Habitat Connectivity
Categories: Environmental Stewardship & Streamlining
Habitat/Ecosystem Connectivity & Conservation
Interagency Coordination
Wildlife and Threatened & Endangered Species
State: California
Organization: California Department of Transportation
Contact: Gary Winters
Title: Chief, Division of Environmental Analysis
Email: gary.winters@dot.ca.gov
Phone: (916) 653-7136
Description: Two intersecting state highways divide a large natural area that includes the Chino Hills, Prado Basin, and Cleveland National Forest in southern California. This area of the Puente-Chino Hills and Santa Ana Mountains totals over 512,000 acres and contains resources of statewide and worldwide significance, including a greater diversity of vegetation types than any other area of comparable size in the United States. The region has been called “an archipelago of tenuously connected habitat islands in a sea of urban area.” The Riverside Freeway and an associated band of urban development have almost dissected the area. Coal Canyon is the only viable linkage remaining; however the linkage was obstructed by an interchange built in the late 1970s to serve anticipated development.

In examining the diminished connectivity in the region and rare habitats, the California State Parks Department concluded that “substantial and potentially catastrophic ecosystem decay will occur in the Chino Hills and Santa Ana Mountains if the Coal Canyon corridor is not acquired and preserved” and that “it can be predicted with certainty, using accepted scientific methods, that numerous local species extinctions will occur if the (wildlife movement) corridor is not maintained.” In response to the request from State Parks and the interest of local groups, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) worked with State Parks to find funding to purchase approximately 685 additional acres of conservation lands adjacent to the freeway and interchange. In the process Caltrans and the California State Parks linked the Tecate Cypress Reserve, the Cleveland National Forest and the Irvine Company’s Gypsum Canyon Preserve. The combined area hosted two federally listed species and a number of other sensitive species and habitats. Nevertheless, the California State Parks determined the value of the acquisition to be far greater than the net acreage and on-site resources; the most important value of the land was the linkage it provided between two large and critically important wildland areas. The habitat purchase by Caltrans and California State Parks, along with adjacent acquisitions, also lowered development pressure. Low usage of the interchange facilitated the decision to remove the on and off ramps to increase habitat connectivity and wildlife mobility. By closing the ramps, removing the pavement and lighting, rearranging fencing, and restricting access, Caltrans created a wildlife crossing with substantial height, width, ample natural lighting, and openness.

Clearly delineated wildlife movement needs with sufficient background information and justification to develop tangible solutions were driving factors in implementing the connectivity improvements. Such background information included wildlife studies, definitive land use plans, and ties to resource land management and existing major natural resource areas.

Caltrans determined that the site has great mitigation value for transportation impacts, but no agreements exist with other resource agencies to obtain credits at this point. Caltrans still considers the site an excellent example of leadership and interagency cooperation, which “indirectly facilitates other transportation efforts.” The interchange removal also complements Caltrans’ work in Western Riverside County on the Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan. Wildlife passage features were incorporated into current and future state highway improvements on the other side of the park, benefiting both federally listed species and non-federally listed species with large habitat ranges. Removal of the crossing allowed Caltrans to show responsiveness to an issue that was sensitive and important to the public, environmental groups, and resource agencies.
Last Updated: Last recorded update not available
Displaying Results 11 - 18 out of 18
<< Previous | Next >>

Search Results


State="California"; Category="all";

No records found.

[New Search]