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State="Missouri"; Category=" all"; Collapse All
1 Practice: Socio-Economic Indicator Resource
Category: GIS and Spatial Data
State: Missouri
Organization: Missouri Department of Transportation
Contact: Ben Reeser
Title: Long Range Transportation Planning Coordinator
Email: Ben.Reeser@modot.mo.gov
Phone: 573-526-0123
Description: The Missouri Department of Transportation's (MoDOT) Socio-Economic Indicator Resource is a joint collaboration between MoDOT and the Office of Social and Economic Data Analysis (OSEDA) to provide up-to-date, authoritative data and information for use in transportation planning and project development. The Indicator Resource Web Page makes available data, maps, tables, charts and graphics and analysis at the level of geography meaningful to MoDOT personnel. Geographic data are divided into the following categories of interest: Missouri Counties, Planning Districts, Regional Planning Commissions, Metropolitan Planning Organizations, and Corridor Studies.
Related Documentation: http://wwwcf.fhwa.dot.gov/exit.cfm?link=http://oseda.missouri.edu/modot/
Last Updated: March 11, 2014
2 Practice: Participation of SHPO Staff in Early Consideration of Corridor Alternatives
Categories: Environmental Stewardship & Streamlining
Historical & Archeological Preservation
State: Missouri
Organization: Missouri Department of Transportation
Contact: Toni Prawl
Title: Historic Preservation Specialist
Email: toni.prawl@modot.mo.gov
Phone: 573-526-3598
Description: Prior to the selection of a preferred alternative for a corridor study, Missouri SHPO staff are invited to participate in a drive-through of the corridor's various alternative alignments under consideration. Other participants in the drive-through typically include MoDOT staff representing project development, public involvement, and historic preservation. As the potentially historic resources are examined, participants discuss the available background information for that cultural resource and the nature of potential highway improvements at that location. This early consultation and on-site viewing provides the SHPO representatives with a better sense of resource setting and integrity compared to that gained from the more traditional submittal and review of paper documentation that follows at a later date. It also enhances the SHPO's sense of being part of the project team rather than an outside review agency. Since this consultation is early in the NEPA process and not all information regarding cultural resources has been compiled and potential project impacts are unclear, it is understood that while SHPO opinions are made in good faith, they are non-binding and could change with further study or information. MoDOT benefits since the SHPO has a better understanding of the resource, its setting, and how the proposed future project might affect it. The consultation also aids in the early identification of potential Section 4(f) resources and other historic resources that should be avoided.
Last Updated: March 11, 2014
3 Practice: Agreement for Access to Cave Database
Category: Habitat/Ecosystem Connectivity & Conservation
State: Missouri
Organization: Missouri Department of Transportation
Contact: Bree McMurray
Title: Senior Environmental Specialist
Email: bree.mcmurray@modot.mo.gov
Phone: 573-526-0606
Description: Caves are unique and irreplaceable ecosystems. In Missouri there are over 6,300 known caves. Prior to 2007, MoDOT had no way to assess potential project impacts to caves other than walking the limits of every project and looking for caves. This is a costly, time prohibitive method. Therefore, caves often times were not considered in the early phases of project development or in the early phases of preparing NEPA documents. Therefore, if a cave was discovered later in the project development process or after construction began on a project, it would result in project delays or destruction of the cave. In March of 2007, MoDOT completed an agreement with the Missouri Speleological Survey (MSS) that provided MoDOT access to the MSS's cave database, which documents the location of all known caves in the state. Now MoDOT can do an initial screening for caves from the office and consider this resource in the initial stages of project development and selection of reasonable alternatives for NEPA documents. This early identification provides MoDOT with many more options to avoid impacts to the caves and is an example of Ecosystem Conservation.
Last Updated: March 11, 2014
4 Practice: Low Water Crossing Modifications as Stream Mitigation Techniques
Categories: Environmental Stewardship & Streamlining
Stormwater, The Clean Water Act, & Section 404
State: Missouri
Organization: Missouri Department of Transportation
Contact: Melissa Scheperle
Title: Senior Environmental Specialist
Email: melissa.scheperle@modot.mo.gov
Phone: 573-526-6684
Description: The continued and increasing need for stream mitigation to offset impacts from highway construction prompted MoDOT to seek out stream-bank restoration projects that provide greater benefits to stream habitat, thereby increasing the amount of credits available for a stream mitigation bank. Missouri fisheries biologists suggested the treatment of low-water crossings within critical habitat for a fish (Niangua darter), federally listed as threatened, providing long-lasting stream and species-specific benefits. Low-water crossings on Missouri county roads can limit aquatic organism movement because they create jump and velocity barriers. Modification of these structures enables fish populations to reconnect, increasing opportunity for genetic diversity and boosting population growth; improving sediment transport; and minimizing future maintenance costs.

Until this project, there was no accepted methodology in Missouri to calculate the amount of stream mitigation credit received by modifying low-water crossings. Development of the survey methodology was a collaborative effort between MoDOT and the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) resulting in a framework of credit calculation for all future low-water crossing improvement projects. Collaboration was also necessary to gain approval of the survey methodology by all five U.S. Army Corps of Engineers districts with jurisdiction in Missouri, Region 7 Environmental Protection Agency, MDC, Region 3 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Once this methodology was established, the first MoDOT Stream Mitigation Bank was approved by these regulatory/resource agencies. The methodology uses an innovative approach demonstrating MoDOT’s commitment to quality stream mitigation projects and provides an optional method to establish mitigation in the state for permitted stream impacts. Since this work is generally done outside of MoDOT right-of-way, an agreement with counties enables the work on the low water crossings.
Last Updated: March 11, 2014
5 Practice: FHWA/MoDOT Agreement for Internal Determination of Section 4(f) Applicability
Categories: Environmental (NEPA) Documentation
Environmental Stewardship & Streamlining
State: Missouri
Organization: Missouri Department of Transportation
Contact: Chris Shulse
Title: Senior Environmental Specialist
Email: christopher.shulse@modot.mo.gov
Phone: 573-526-6678
Description: A programmatic agreement between FHWA and MoDOT, for both MoDOT and off-systems federally funded projects that would use property from publicly owned parks, wildlife and waterfowl refuges, and historic sites. Section 4(f) of the U.S. Department of Transportation Act of 1966 is not applicable for projects that involve the construction or maintenance of bicycle and pedestrian lanes, paths or facilities within a publicly-owned or leased park if there is no change of ownership and the use of the property remains recreational. Section 4(f) is also not applicable for projects that may require a change in ownership of small amounts of publicly-owned lands, such as schools or conservation land, because in such cases the publicly owned property is not a park or a refuge, and the small amount of land needed for the project is not used or planned to be used primarily for recreational purposes.

This unique agreement is allows for an unparalleled improvement in efficiency for MoDOT. The agreement enables well over 90% of Section 4(f) issues to be resolved at the state DOT level. Section 4(f) concerns that formerly took a month to resolve for each project can now be concluded the same day, demonstrating a significant savings in time and money.

This programmatic Section 4(f) inapplicability determination allows MoDOT to classify applicable MoDOT and local projects as having met the requirements of Section 4(f) without submitting each project to FHWA for an inapplicability determination.
Last Updated: March 11, 2014
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